There are differences between BSN and ADN nurses

There are differences between BSN and ADN nurses. For examples, leadership, management, public health and many more. There have been researches that have proved that lower mortality rates and few medication mistakes. BSN nurses are better trained and qualified to meet the needs better than ADN nurses. There is positive outcome when a patient is being taken care by a BSN nurse. BSN program teaches more than ADN program.
In the article “The Real Difference Between ADN And BSN Nurses” from Nightingale College talks about the difference between ADN and BSN nurses. In the article it said BSN nurses are more highly qualified to meet the patient’s needs. BSN program and ADN program are similar but in BSN program they also teach the students management, leadership, public health, communication. Also teaches how to use new technology and better understanding in complex issues. They said BSN nurses would have a bigger paycheck, secured job, more opportunities, and social mobility.
A BSN nurse can drastically lower mortality rates. For example, in the article “American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Fact Sheet: Creating a More Highly Qualified Nursing Workforce” a researcher named Olga Yakusheva along with her colleges found out that with a 10% increase of BSN prepared nurses would lower the chances of a patient’s morality by 10.9%. Also, these nurses could lower the patient’s stay and readmission to the hospital. (American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Fact Sheet: Creating a More Highly Qualified Nursing Workforce, 2015 pg. 2) This means lower morality, lower stay, less chance for readmission for the patient. Another example is, in the article “American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Fact Sheet: Creating a More Highly Qualified Nursing Workforce” a team of researchers from several nursing schools in South Korea and the University of Pennsylvania found that a 10% increase in BSN prepared nurses was linked with a 9% decrease in patient deaths in South Korean hospitals (American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Fact Sheet: Creating a More Highly Qualified Nursing Workforce, 2015 pg. 2). This means there was and could only be 1% death under the supervision of an BSN nurse. Other example is, in the article “American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Fact Sheet: Creating a More Highly Qualified Nursing Workforce” in August 2008 researchers examined the effect of nursing practice environments on outcomes of hospitalized cancer patients undergoing surgery, a doctor named Dr. Christopher Friese and his colleagues found out that nursing education level was crucially associated with patient outcomes. Nurses prepared at the BSN level were associated with lower mortality and failure-to-rescue rates. (American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Fact Sheet: Creating a More Highly Qualified Nursing Workforce, 2015 pg. 3) This is an example that even with cancer patients there is less likely to be risk of death.
There is positive outcome when a patient is being taken care by a BSN nurse. For example, , in the article “American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Fact Sheet: Creating a More Highly Qualified Nursing Workforce” has shown in a study that was released in the May stated that Dr. Linda Aiken and her colleagues stated that every 10% increase in the proportion of BSN nurses in the hospital staff was associated with a 4% lower risk of death. (American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Fact Sheet: Creating a More Highly Qualified Nursing Workforce, 2015 pg. 3). This means a 10% increase in the portion of BSN nurses there would be 4% decrease in risk of death. Another example is, “In a study published in the March/April 2005 Nursing Research, Dr. Carole Estabrooks and her colleagues at the University of Alberta found that baccalaureate prepared nurses have a positive impact on mortality rates following an examination of more than 18,000 patient outcomes at 49 Canadian hospitals. This study, The Impact of Hospital Nursing Characteristics on 30-Day Mortality, confirmed the findings from Dr. Aiken’s landmark study from 2003.” (American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Fact Sheet: Creating a More Highly Qualified Nursing Workforce, 2015 pg. 4) This quote represent that the risk of death positively impacted the research with 18,00 patients under the care of BSN nurses. An example is, “In a study published in the September 24, 2003 Journal of the American Medical Association, Dr. Linda Aiken and her colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania identified a clear link between higher levels of nursing education and better patient outcomes. This extensive study found that surgical patients have a “substantial survival advantage” if treated in hospitals with higher proportions of nurses educated at the baccalaureate or higher degree level. A 10% increase in the proportion of nurses holding BSN degrees decreased the risk of patient death and failure to rescue by 5%.” (American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Fact Sheet: Creating a More Highly Qualified Nursing Workforce, 2015 pg. 4) This quote is about surgical patients have survival advantage if he or she is taken care of with a huge group of BSN nurses.
In conclusion, there are differences between BSN and ADN nurses. For examples, leadership, management, public health and many more. There have been researches that have proved that lower mortality rates and few medication mistakes. BSN nurses are better trained and qualified to meet the needs better than ADN nurses. There is positive outcome when a patient is being taken care by a BSN nurse. BSN program teaches more than ADN program.